Bisbee Science Lab

Bisbee Science Lab


(playful guitar music) – At school you just look
at the teacher, take notes, it’s all very paper and boring and here it’s all hands-on
learning and experiments, and there’s more discoveries which is a big part of
science that I enjoy. – As you can see the red
wire and the blue wire are connected to a battery,
connects to another battery, (light playful music) makes movement between it
which causes electricity which causes the vibration. Here you learn about cells,
you learn about the body, you learn about
electricity, gravity, everything you wouldn’t
usually learn about in just one class. – As you can see, this is
the beating heart, obviously. You can change it into… those are blood
cells, vessels, veins. I’ve always wanted to be
working in a science lab about biology, circuitry,
any type honestly. I’ve always been
interested science. – That became really
clear in this area that there were no informal
STEM opportunities for kids. It’s one of the real
opportunity gaps in this country actually for
kids in rural communities. If these kids who
are our docents lived in Tucson or Phoenix, their school might take him
to the children’s museum or to the Arizona Science Center but to get from Bisbee to
the Arizona Science Center with kids, it’s a
really hard trip, especially when we don’t
have a lot of money in the schools right now. – My name is Jude
Bruno, I’m 11 years old and I’m in sixth grade. I’m also a docent at the
Science Lab in Old Bisbee. I started docenting the
second day it opened. – [Etta] Yeah, there
you go, that’s it. – My name is Angelo Encinas,
and I’m 12 years old and I’m a docent here at
the Bisbee Science Lab. – I’m Scout Day, I go
to Bisbee high school and I’m a freshman. – [Etta] It dawned on
me and my colleagues that we needed some
kind of environment where the kids could go
and have really exciting informal experiences
in Cochise County. (slow somber music) – While my friend
was volunteering here and he took me to
the Grand Opening and I just pretty much fell
in love with everything. There was a 3D printer and I was watching this
little bear being printed out and then I tried the VR
and it was just so crazy that I decided I had
to be a part of it. I really like the slime, so
I help with the slime a lot. We mix glue, borax and water and like glitter
and food coloring and then it turns out like this. I like to play with it, it’s very relaxing
to just squish it. – My mom is a science
teacher at Naco and she’s been teaching
for about two years. She’s the one who obviously
started me into this business and honestly I don’t
think I can end it. There’s a little
something that I love. I want to be a computer engineer and maybe even make some
video games if I can but I’ve always loved circuitry, I’ve taken apart consoles,
controllers, computers, to see how they work and
put them back together. My dad did teach
me a lot about it, he was amazing, he was
the love of my existence, he was just a great guy. He passed away last year, so
I can’t really see him anymore but he still lives in my heart. (slow peaceful music) – There are kids that
are here a half a day playing with the stuff
that’s on the tables and the slime and the
VR so I think we got, I think we were surprised by
how interested the kids were in the space and in
spending time here. (slow bright music) We started the Science
Fridays in the space, we didn’t get a lot of kids ’cause there’s not a lot
of kids in Old Bisbee. So we’re now in the annex, ’cause there’s a lot of
kids in those neighborhoods. There’s a lot of rural
schools in the United States that don’t have
school on Friday, it was seen as a
cost-cutting mechanism. – These are all the
pieces to design a chariot that will look
something like this. (excited gasps) – [Etta] We wanted to provide a weekly science
experience for kids on Fridays when
there was no school. Right now the Arizona
Science Center is doing two projects a month. So we’re just trying
to get the word out and build into
people’s understandings that on Friday afternoons
there’s Hands-On
Science going on. Building that reputation
and getting the word out been more challenging for us than we thought it was gonna be. You know we thought
if we build it, they will come, right? (laughs) – [Instructor] And
we’re going to turn this until the blue dot on
the Sphero is facing us. – Schools can’t do this alone
is the fact of the matter. Teachers need to
be kinda retrained in how to do field
work with students, how to do hands-on
science with students, so the schools may not do it the way we’d all
like it to be done but the schools really face
a lot of uphill battles. So we sort of feel like we’re
a partner with the schools and we can do those
things in the Science Lab that the teachers can’t
do in their classroom. – [Instructor] Raise your hands
in the air if you’re ready! Go, go, go, go, go! (children laughing) Oh, that was out! – [Etta] The ultimate goal is to have some kind of
permanent Science Center lab in Bisbee and what that
ultimately looks like is something that
we hope to hear from the community about it. (children laughing) – Usually, people come here to
think “Oh, it’s just science, “more school, great.” – Have you ever seen us do VR
or make slime in our school? I have not. – [Scout] It’s just so
much fun helping people and helping them
understand science. (bright music)