March for Science?

March for Science?


April 22nd, 2017 is the March for Science, taking place in cities across America and the world. The last few months have seen a lot of marches in the United States, so what makes a march for science unique? The stereotype of scientists is that they are loath to openly support political causes and parties, in part out of a fear of politicization of their work undermining their funding ,and in part because of the objective ideal of science itself. Science, ideally, is out to discover reality -which is unchanged by the fickle whims politics and public desires. But science does not actually exist in a bubble – Much as gravity will not suddenly cease existing if we refuse to believe in it, many researchers are worried about the consequences of a future in which we decide that findings that we do not like can be wished away. So scientists are marching! Are they marching politically? Well, it’s complicated. There has been lots and lots of debate about the degree to which the march for science is or isn’t partisan, if it should be advocating for specific scientific topics such as climate change, and even if the march should be political at all. Officially it isn’t. But if there is a need to march for science, does that mean some other force is moving against it? Participants are very conflicted on whether the march should be acknowledging the…uh… elephant in the room. Science and the technology that results from it impact virtually every aspect of life. Will this march for science usher in a new level of cooperation between scientists and the public? Will it dispel the stereotype of scientists as old men with crazy hair who spend their time tinkering in a dark lab? Will it help reverse the politicization of Science, or force participants to pick sides and dig in? Will you be at the March for Science? If you enjoyed this video, like, comment, subscribe, and check out our other videos. Thanks for watching!