Matthew Dea

Science: Latest Scientific Discoveries

Tag: Hank Green

Behavioral Economics: Crash Course Economics #27

Behavioral Economics: Crash Course Economics #27

Adriene: Hi, this is Crash Course Economics, I’m Adriene Hill. Jacob: And I’m Jacob Clifford. So, when economists make their models, they generally assume that people are rational and predictable. Adriene: But when we look at actual human beings, it turns out that people are impulsive, shortsighted, and, a lot of times, just plain irrational. […]

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Ampère’s Law: Crash Course Physics #33

Ampère’s Law: Crash Course Physics #33

It was the autumn of 1820. Hans Christian Oersted had just discovered the connection between electricity and magnetism. Meanwhile, a French physicist named André-Marie Ampère was experimenting with some wires, trying to learn more about the connection between currents and the magnetic fields they create. He took two parallel wires, ran a current through both […]

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Vectors and 2D Motion: Crash Course Physics #4

Vectors and 2D Motion: Crash Course Physics #4

So far, we’ve spent a lot of time predicting movement: where things are, where they’re going, and how quickly they’re gonna get there. But there’s something missing — something that has a lot to do with Harry Styles. And today, we’re gonna address that. We’ve been talking about what happens when you do things like […]

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The Economics of Immigration: Crash Course Econ #33

The Economics of Immigration: Crash Course Econ #33

Hi, I’m Adriene Hill, this is Crash Course Economics, and today we’re going to talk about Immigration and how it affects economies. So, that poem on the statue of liberty? The one that reads in part, “Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming […]

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Work, Energy, and Power: Crash Course Physics #9

Work, Energy, and Power: Crash Course Physics #9

When I say “work,” what’s the first thing that comes to mind? Maybe a cubicle? Or a briefcase? Or that history exam that’s coming up soon? But if you’re a physicist, work has a very specific meaning — one that has very little to do with spreadsheets or the fall of the Roman Empire. Today, […]

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Strong Interaction: The Four Fundamental Forces of Physics #1b

Hi! Today we’re gonna continue talking about one of the four fundamental forces of physics, the strong force, which is so awesomely strong that it’s taking two episodes for me to describe it to you, so if you haven’t already, I highly suggest watching the first one. [whispers] I don’t… know what’s up with this. […]

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Torque: Crash Course Physics #12

Torque: Crash Course Physics #12

You have a box. A ring. And a marble. And they’re all at the top of a ramp. Because you know how physics loves ramps. Especially hypothetical ramps! So, let’s say this ramp would allow for static friction, but not kinetic friction. Now, you let go of all of these objects at the same time, […]

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Electric Fields: Crash Course Physics #26

Electric Fields: Crash Course Physics #26

Last time, we talked about how charged particles exert electrostatic forces on one another. We calculated these forces using the charge of each particle: which can be either positive or negative, and the distance between them, and we did it with the help of Coulomb’s Law: the equation that tells us the force generated by […]

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Computer Networks: Crash Course Computer Science #28

Hi, I’m Carrie Anne, and welcome to CrashCourse Computer Science! The internet is amazing. In just a few keystrokes, we can stream videos on Youtube — Hello! — read articles on Wikipedia, order supplies on amazon, video chat with friends, and tweet about the weather. Without a doubt, the ability for computers, and their users, […]

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The Industrial Revolution: Crash Course History of Science #21

The Industrial Revolution: Crash Course History of Science #21

You probably know some of the signs of industrialization in the nineteenth century: Trains connected cities, symbolizing progress. But they also brought about the destruction of rural lands, divisions between social classes, and rapid urbanization. Clocks, meanwhile, became technologies of standardization: They created a universal time, as opposed to a local “sun time.” But clocks […]

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