The blue whale: a three-year labour of love | Natural History Museum

The blue whale: a three-year labour of love | Natural History Museum


It’s strange coming here today and seeing
this. I think when we started you don’t ever think so much about the finished product, you just
kind of take one step at a time. I’ve never worked on anything like this, what
am I thinking? I’ve never worked on anything as big and as significant as this. The skeleton was first put up in 1934, so it’s been 83 years since anyone has moved this whale. Signatures? Yes, and one of them is Gerrard. Really? The top one, yeah. Gerrard’s was the company
that actually was employed by the museum to articulate the skeleton. And it’s signed February 1934, which is when
the work was completed. I think the team that put this thing up in
1934 would be amazed at how far we’ve come, and we have come a long way. So you’ve just got this fantastic thick carpet
going all the way. Brilliant. There’s an area we were a bit concerned about,
where a crack had opened very slightly. We’ve had to be very creative at times, to
come up with solutions to problems. The red line has stayed exactly where it was
when we first put this on, so we know this crack has not opened up and not moved in any
sense so that’s a really good sign. Signing it, really, for me, it’s two things
really. One is just a reminder of all the work that we’ve done really since 2014, and
all the hard work that the team has put in, how close we’ve all grown as friends, and
how we’ve been supporting each other through the way and respected each other’s expertise,
which is amazing. But also a link back to the past, to 1934,
when the whale was put up. And that’s a really amazing feeling as well. Millimetre by millimetre, we’ve been putting
this whale up over the last few days, and we’ve finally got to the exact height that
we want. We have the whale in her final position, so
that’s so thrilling.