The Excelano Project: Mental Health Awareness and Empowerment

The Excelano Project: Mental Health Awareness and Empowerment


(lights clicking) – [Interviewer]
Alright you ready? (deep sigh) – Sometimes the world
can feel like it’s ending and there doesn’t
have to be a because. For you, it can just be ending. – And you look on your own body wanting to pull back
from it’s weakness. What you know of
strength doesn’t smile or alternatively,
it smiles too much when it doesn’t mean it. – Composure is a glass arm
you wave until it shatters but there is that moment
before shattering. Hold it. Look up, count the seconds
of air you are taking in. Feel it in the
small of your back. Focus on the inside
of your chest or the back of your
knees feel like. – In those nights that
feel like pure black, empty, dirty nothing, and
you lie, clenched fists and unfeeling, it’s
okay to unfurl. – Uncalloused and
open, it’s okay to reach for the world softly. – Because these nights
are not the beginning of the final act. Tomorrow will come
cleanly again, I promise. – I promise there
will be mornings. The light through the window shrouding your bed in
glitter, in yellow. – And so it has been
through the history of time, every trench of nightfall
has fallen through and given way to the sun. – And you will rise as
weightless as a ray is and shower everything
around you in light. Tomorrow will come
again, I promise. – Tomorrow will come again, I promise with
staggering applauses. You will reward yourself
for all the little, beautiful things. – And you will be strong
and kind and knowing just like you are now, only this time you
will be able to see it. – A drop of you could
leave a country full. You are full. If no one drinks, oh well. – Oh well. If no one sees your sacrifice,
the only loss is theirs. Let them see you. – Let them see you. – See the poetry in getting up, making eggs, washing your hair. – The reflection of
light from the TV dancing over palm
oil-stained paper plates and how your niece’s
pupils swim back and forth picking you out in a
sea of brown faces. – The thumping
kick-drums of afrobeats and you will want to play
afrobeat, so play it. – Let go of how
tiring it is to be an immigrant’s
American dream child, how heavy a body can feel when it is buried
beneath pressure. – How lonely it is to be
around people you know but not really. – Remember eating
breakfast outside for the first time in months. The lilting of
your baba’s accent, the high notes in
your mother’s laughter when she watches
90’s sitcom reruns. – Remember how
happy this made you. Remember how happy you
make others for just being, and just be.