The Nemeth Braille Code for Mathematics and Scientific Notation – 2

The Nemeth Braille Code for Mathematics and Scientific Notation – 2


>>Susan Osterhaus:
This green book — and it does have of
course white letters on it, this is the official Nemeth
Braille Code for the Mathematics and Scientific Notation. And this is what I would
call the Bible or the code. Now the book, the official
book is going to be green. In this particular case, it is
in binder form but a lot of you, a lot of you may
have an older version of this that is hardbound. Don’t panic. You’re looking for
the green book. This one, again, has
some white on it but most of the older versions
are completely green. And now I’m going to go ahead
and, and open it up for you to see a little better. But, again, this is the
official Braille Code. This is the print
version available from the American Printing
House for the Blind. And if you go ahead and look
inside, you have got tons and tons of examples
and explanations, everything there is
that you’d ever want to know about the code. And appendices and
way in the back, you have your general index. Now I’m going to tell
you, the problem though, with this particular
book is the index. If you look in here and
I’m not sure if we can — let’s see if we can find it. If, if you’ve go to look
for exponent — let me see. I’m looking and I’m
looking right up here. And if exponent were there,
it should be between exercises and expressions and
there’s nothing there. So the first time I looked at
that, I went, where am I — I want to work with exponents. What you have to look
for is superscript. So if you look way over here. Let me see if I can
find it quickly. We have something about
superscripts right here and it talks about alignment
and spatial arrangement and, and denoting a footnote,
plurals, and then it continues
on the next page. But it does not call
these exponents. It calls them superscripts so — and then it goes
into more detail. This is starting to sound
a little more mathematical. Superscripts and subscripts and, and goes into all the different
ways that you might find those. But what I’m trying to
get at is the terminology in this book can be difficult
for the novice for sure. And even the person who’s more
experienced so most of the time, when you look at a seasoned
transcriber, all along, along the edges,
you’re going to find where they’ve made
little tags and notations so they can find things
a little more quickly. But if you need a, especially if you need the higher level
mathematics, you’re going to need to use the green book because it is the
official code, okay? So keep that in mind. And, again, it’s available from
the American Printing House for the Blind on
federal quota money, both in print and braille. I’m — I can’t remember
now whether I — I don’t believe that the braille
volumes have a green cover but they could. All I can remember is that they
were five, it’s five volumes in braille so just
to let you know that. But, again, available
on federal quota money so that is the first book
I want to show you….